Monday, May 25, 2009

Bird watching in Rajarata

Field visit to Mihinthale

FOGSL members participated in another successful field visit at Mihinthale from 30th April to 03rd May. Rajarata University premises, adjacent irrigation tanks and the surrounding area were good birding area since it provided wide variety of species. Participants were able to join with a bird netting training programme which was conducted for the students of the University by FOGSL. A total of 96 species including two endemic species were recorded during the visit

.

Participants: Prof. S.W. Kotagama, Ms. Sujatha Mayadunnage, Mr. G. Herath, Miss. Yuraji Karunaratne, Mr. A. Jayasekara, Mrs. Sindy de Silva, Mrs. Shamila Perera, Mrs. Cheryl Silva, Mr. Indrika Pradeepa


List of birds recorded
Sri Lanka Junglefowl
Indian Peafowl
Cotton Pygmy-goose
Painted Stork
Asian Openbill
Woolly-necked Stork
Black-headed Ibis
Indian Pond-heron
Cattle Egret
Purple Heron
Great Egret
Intermediate Egret
Little Egret
Little Cormorant
Oriental Darter
Brahminy Kite
Grey-headed Fish-eagle
Crested Serpent-eagle
Shikra
Changeable Hawk-eagle
White-breasted Waterhen
Purple Swamphen
Common Moorhen
Barred Buttonquail
Eurasian Thick-knee
Red-wattled Lapwing
Pheasant-tailed Jacana
Whiskered Tern
Spotted Dove
Emerald Dove
Orange-breasted Green-pigeon
Pompadour Green-pigeon
Alexandrine Parakeet
Rose-ringed Parakeet
Asian Koel
Blue-faced Malkoha
Greater Coucal
Indian Nightjar
Asian Palm-swift
Little Swift
Crested Treeswift
Malabar Trogon
White-throated Kingfisher
Common Kingfisher
Little Green Bee-eater
Sri Lanka Grey Hornbill
Malabar Pied Hornbill
Brown-headed Barbet
Crimson-fronted Barbet
Coppersmith Barbet
Greater Flameback
White-naped Woodpecker
Ashy Woodswallow
Common Iora
Common Woodshrike
Large Cuckooshrike
Black-headed Cuckooshrike
Small Minivet
Brown Shrike
Black-hooded Oriole
Black Drongo
White-bellied Drongo
Asian Paradise-flycatcher
House Crow
Jungle Crow
Hill Swallow
Red-rumped Swallow
Jerdon's Bushlark
Ashy-crowned Sparrow-lark
Zitting Cisticola
Jungle Prinia
Ashy Prinia
Plain Prinia
Black-crested Bulbul
Red-vented Bulbul
White-browed Bulbul
Common Tailorbird
Brown-capped Babbler
Tawny-bellied Babbler
Yellow-eyed Babbler
Yellow-billed Babbler
Oriental White-eye
Common Myna
Oriental Magpie-robin
White-rumped Shama
Indian Robin
Tickell's Blue-flycatcher
Jerdon's Leafbird
Golden-fronted Leafbird
Pale-billed Flowerpecker
Purple-rumped Sunbird
Purple Sunbird
Long-billed Sunbird
White-rumped Munia
Scaly-breasted Munia
Paddyfield Pipit

Bird list and photos: Indrika Pradeepa

4 comments:

adaman said...

I am Kelum Prasad Jayasuriya. Last wednesday (2009-06-03) I saw very important bird
I just want to put a note in your web site as a record...

Name of the Bird : Christmas Island Frigatebird
Venue : Palmyra Avenue- Bambalapitiya
Date : 2009-06-03
Time : 09:16:55Am to 09:17:13Am
I have good quality photograph and I can send it to you to put in your web site....
I am waiting for your reply

Thanking you
Kelum

Field Ornithology Group of Sri Lanka said...

Kelum,

Yes, It is very important record since there were handful of records, mostly unconfirmed. Please send your report on the observation with more details to FOGSL (fogsl@slt.lk). Don't forget to send photos.

You can record your observations at the 'Sri Lanka Birds' web based database (www.worldbirds.org/srilanka), if you are interested.

adaman said...

there were some mistake in our identification...
first we identified that bird as the "Juvenile Female Christmas Island Frigatebird"
But,
yesterday I got a different identification & confirmation from the Bird Expertice
It is not a Christmas Island Frigatebird, it is a "Lesser Frigatebird"
if you want to see the discussions of the Lak Dasun forum please follow up these link...

http://www.lakdasun.com/forum/index.php?topic=602.msg2760#msg2760

Field Ornithology Group of Sri Lanka said...

Kelum,

Sea Birds are always a difficult group to identify.

There are very few number of credible records of the Lesser Frigatebird from Sri Lanka. Hence this observation is very important to increase our knowledge on the status of this species in Sri Lanka. If you are still interested to publish a report on this blog, we welcome you.